Bryson DeChambeau’s back nine implosion at the U.S. Open was a wonderful thing to see. It was, after all, one of the highlights of the tournament, and all the more impressive because he was playing in his first major events. Unfortunately, the beauty of his collapse is that it will likely help the PGA Tour determine how it moves forward.

“So, there it is, folks. The young phenom has imploded at a time when he was on the brink of his biggest tournament yet; one that could have vaulted him into the top 10 in the world rankings. It’s a heartbreaking tale, and one that would have been a lot less shocking had he never made the turn at all.”

One of the most notorious collapses of the century has occurred at the U.S. Open. On the par-4 9th hole of the final round, Bryson DeChambeau went for a casual birdie and missed. After hitting a poor shot, Bryson had to hole out for par, but instead, he failed to hole out for par and made a quadruple-bogey 7. This put him out of contention and he finished the tournament with a -3 score, as he was forced to play 18 holes out of 72. The 12th and final hole of the tournament saw Bryson miss a 3-footer for par, and then he approached the gallery to ask for a “fairway” to the green. Read more about 2020 us open golf and let us know what you think.

Midway through the final round of the 2021 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines Golf Course, Bryson Deschambault seemed destined to repeat his triumph at last year’s major championship. The big hitting golfer was one stroke ahead of the rest of the field with eight holes to go, but those eight holes would soon be forgotten.

After his embarrassing abandonment on the final straight, Deschambault finished 26th in the championship. His slip on the back nine didn’t just rob him of a second consecutive U.S. Open title, however. By doing so, he potentially cost himself $2.16 million.

Bryson Deschambault was in a good position to win the U.S. Open and earn $2.25 million

Bryson Deschambault leaves the 18. Green after the final round of the 2021 U.S. Open at Torrey Pines Golf Course | Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images

Only about fifteen players made it to the final round of the U.S. Open and had a chance to win the trophy. Louis Oosthuizen, Russell Henley and Mackenzie Hughes combined to lead at 5-under par, but with only one win in the majors for three, this trio was expected to pull away on Sunday.

That’s exactly what happened early in the round, with Henley and Hughes quickly knocked out of the fight. Oosthuizen held his own for most of the day, but the established players caught up to him pretty quickly.

One of them was Deschambault, who missed his approach shot on the par-3 eighth hole by less than a yard. He finished on 5-under par with an impressive birdie to share the lead. After two pars on the ninth and tenth holes, Deschambault was alone in the lead.

The muscular striker needed only a clean back nine with a pair of birdies to earn his second consecutive U.S. Open victory.

Deschambault robbed himself of a potential $2.16 million by making a mistake on the final nine

Deschambault approached the par-3 11th hole without a single bogey in his final 30 holes. He was traveling as carefree as you’d expect at the U.S. Open, but it all fell apart on the back nine Sunday.

The 27-year old unexpectedly had to accept his first bogey of the day on the 11th hole. Then another one in 12th position. And then a double bogey at #13. In just 30 minutes, Deschambault went from absolute favorite to total underdog.

To make matters worse, on the 17th. He had an 8th hole with four bogeys, putting him outside the top 20. He finished the tournament in 26th place. This place earned him $87,941.

The amount he would have made if he had gone on to win? $2.25 million. Deschambault’s shocking loss on the back nine cost him a possible $2.16 million.

Woof.

I did not get the right breaks at the right time

.

After a disappointing final round, Deschambault didn’t seem to think he was playing that badly. Never mind that almost all of his shots miss the fairway from miles away on the right side. Forget the many chips on 17. Hole on the way to a quadruple bogey. Instead, Deschambault decided he was just unlucky.

I’m not out of line at all. It’s golf, he said Sunday from Torrey Pines. People will say I did this or that, but it’s just golf. I’ve hit worse than today many times and still won. It was just one of those times when I didn’t have the right breaks at the right time. I could have easily been 7 or 8 below normal today. I just wasn’t confident in my abilities and had some bad luck on the bumps and other places.

It’s easy to blame others when you’ve just seen 2 million go up in smoke.

COMPARED TO: What was the longest shot taken by Bryson Deschambault?

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